Nuclear Plant Did What?

(RightIsRight.co) – In what seems to be an insult to injury, human mistakes led to a nuclear-related accident in one of the most infamous locations on the planed that many years ago was struck by a radioactive tragedy.

A significant leak of radioactive water was reported at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the same that was devastated by an earthquake and a tsunami in 2011.

Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) said that approximately 5.5 metric tons of water laced with radioactive substances escaped because valves on water treatment equipment were left open during maintenance activities.

The leaked water contained 22 billion becquerels of radioactive materials like cesium and strontium, luckily it was reported that the areas around the abandoned plant have not been compromised for now meaning they have no radioactive risk yet.

In order to prevent further damage to the environment the valve was quickly closed thus avoiding more leaks in the surroundings of the power plant.

The latest report says that at least 5.5 tonnes of water leaked, affecting the vicinity of the nuclear plant. It is now being planned to remove all the probably contaminated soil affected by the water leak and close the area of the incident to prevent people and/or animals from being affected by the radioactive waste that was in the water.

This incident is a sad reminder of what happened in the infamous Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident 12 years ago, where an earthquake and a tsunami brought chaos and corruption to the land, causing suffering to people living in the area back then. In that incident, there were no people killed by the radiation but for obvious reasons, all the civilians in the area had to be relocated immediately as their lives were at risk.

Many years have passed since the accident that rivaled the Chernobyl accident in terms of level as they are the only two nuclear accidents rated as level 7 by the INES (International Nuclear Event Scale) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).